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  1. Intel Core i3-7350k 7th Generation Processor (4M Cache, 4.20GHz)
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    Intel Core i3-7350k 7th Generation Processor (4M Cache, 4.20GHz)
    Special Price ₹7,299.00 Regular Price ₹7,599.00

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Locked vs unlocked CPU

Have you been planning to buy a new PC or upgrading your current processor? Well, if you are, it would be only natural if you tried doing a thorough research before coming to the conclusion. While browsing the available options to buy processor, you might have come across the terms “locked” and “unlocked” processors. If you are wondering what do these terms actually imply, this blog is for you.

So, what is the difference between a locked and an unlocked processor? Which one of these should you choose to buy? Let's find out.

An unlocked processor allows you to change the clock settings of the CPU which means that you can overclock it. While, on the other hand, locked CPUs cannot be overclocked. Denoted without the k at the end of its name, locked CPUs do not give you the freedom to change the CPU settings. Unlocked processors are denoted with a k at the end of the model number, like the Core i7-4770k and Haswell-E Core i7-5820k, and are made with an unlocked clock multiplier. These processors can run under extreme pressure due to the overclocking, and when coupled with a worthy chipset, they can be overclocked for faster than factory core speeds.

Let's assume that you're a light or moderate user, and you wouldn't need to overclock your CPU. Could this mean that you should simply avoid these unlocked processors? Should you buy processor that quickly? The answer to this isn't black or white, but rather lies somewhere in the grey region. Intel made a smart move when they made their fastest processor by stock core speed, the i7-6700k, an unlocked processor. This straight away implies that if you're looking for the top processor in India, with the highest processing speed possible,  you would have to buy the i7- 6700k, even if you do not plan on overclocking it at all. Surely, if you do not require such processing speed and power at your disposal, you might as well buy a locked CPU.

Are turbo and overclocking the same?

Did you notice that all current Intel i5 and i7 processors list two different clock speeds in their specifications list? This is the turbo feature included with these processors. It might seem quite similar to overclocking, but that is not the case. The turbo mode is just temporary overclocking that the processor does to itself automatically when in need of a little extra thrust.

So this was the comparison between a locked and an unlocked CPU. Although there are only a few differences that make these two distinct, they do make a noticeable difference, and must be taken into consideration before making a smart purchase. If you are someone with an upcoming upgrade schedule, do not forget to check out our website for the top processor in India.

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